Shanghai Disney Retail Magic: Part II

In our previous post, we had a chance to take a look at the retail magic found in Shanghai Disneyland. We had a chance to move up the right side of Mickey Avenue, head over to Treasure Cove, and then continue counter-clockwise around to Fantasyland. Today we’re going to continue that direction, finishing out Fantasyland, move through Tomorrowland, and then finish out in Avenue M Arcade. We might even have an encore.

Fantasyland Continued

Without seeing any signage, see if you can guess what the theme is of this next mercantile location?

Shanghai Disney Retail
Retail–in a quiet village. Every day–like the one before. Photo by J. Jeff Kober.

Be our guest at Be Our Guest Boutique. While the new Fantasyland addition at Magic Kingdom includes a whole section devoted to Beauty and the Beast, this is the only real presence you will find in the park. Let’s step inside.

Shanghai Disney Retail
Some of these objects look familiar. Photo by J. Jeff Kober.

The merchandise is very similar to Bonjour Village Gifts, again in Magic Kingdom, though there are a few items not related directly to the film. There are other product lines, many of them princess-related.

Shanghai Disney Retail
Note the dessert style touches to the retail shelfing. Photo by J. Jeff Kober.

And there are some thematic touches that are not just focused on a quaint French village. Here’s my favorite:

Shanghai Disney Retail
Clever clock wall–appropriate for Fantasyland. Photo by J. Jeff Kober.

Who wouldn’t love a clock set in their home like that! It’s just one of the wonderful details I so love about the retail spaces here in this park.

Across a courtyard, which subtly leads to a set of restrooms, is our next and final major retail location in Fantasyland. This is Mickey & Minnie’s Mercantile:

Shanghai Disney Magic
The cottage exterior of Mickey & Minnie’s Mercantile. Photo by J. Jeff Kober.

You can see that the focus of this shop is Mickey-themed merchandise:

Shanghai Disney Retail
I love the spools of thread behind the register area. Photo by J. Jeff Kober.

There are some interesting placards around the room:

Disney Shanghai Retail
Anyone who slays a giant needs a royal charter. Photo by J. Jeff Kober.

In this image, don’t just look at the plaque, but the design of the wallpaper behind it:

Shanghai Disney Retail
This is one honored mouse. Photo by J. Jeff Kober.

On of my favorite pieces in the entire park is this one. It is really clever:

Shanghai Disney Retail
This store has its theming “all buttoned up” Photo by J. Jeff Kober.

Tomorrowland

Now we’re off to Tomorrowland. Now we know that the biggest joke about Disney attractions is that they always lead to a gift shop. Well, this gift shop has not just one, but two attractions leading into it. Intergalactic Imports stands ready for your shopping needs whether you’ve just encountered Stitch or supported rescuing the galaxy with Buzz Lightyear. It’s a good sized shop, sandwiched between both attractions.

Shanghai Disney Retail
Intergalactic Imports. Photo by J. Jeff Kober.

Retail wise, a much more interesting, though intimate retail location is at the exit of another attraction–this time the Tron Lightcycle Power Run.

Shanghai Disney Retail
Not only Disney plush, Tron style, but even Duffy the Bear. Photo by J. Jeff Kober.

What’s truly amazing is that they have ramped up so much product line for this film. I have never seen so much Tron merchandise. And it’s pretty cool!

Shanghai Disney Retail
A remarkable amount of retail dedicated to Tron. Photo by J. Jeff Kober.

Avenue M Arcade

We’ll weave our way back to Mickey Avenue to see the remaining–and biggest– merchandise venues inside Shanghai Disneyland. Here we come upon Avenue M Arcade. We enter through a familiar site–the Carthay Circle Theater.

Carthay Circle Theater marks one entry to the Avenue M Arcade. Photo by J. Jeff Kober.
Carthay Circle Theater marks one entry to the Avenue M Arcade. Photo by J. Jeff Kober.

Avenue M Arcade is Shanghai Disneyland’s Emporium. It stretches the entire side of the street. You can traverse the entire length of the street inside the building and never have to exit outside. The word arcade suggests a covered passageway with shops along both sides. That pretty well defines what you will experience. Each retail outlet holds its own thematic experience as well as dedicated merchandise. Here is one boutique that suggests a sort of “bird in a gilded cage” look–only the bird is Daisy:

Shanghai Disney Retail
Boutique shops off of the arcade. Photo by J. Jeff Kober.

There are other entry points into this mini retail mall. This one is Goofy About Toys:

Shanghai Disney Retail
Eclectic Entrance to Goofy’s Toys. Photo by J. Jeff Kober.

Goofy has clearly been responsible for the look and feel of this shop which plays off of his “how to” cartoon series. It is stuffed with details in every direction. Perhaps too many details, as this creates a very congested look.

Shanghai Disney Retail
Theming plays off of Goofy’s skills in hooking together home theater systems. Photo by J. Jeff Kober.

Still, there are some hidden gems in this clutter. Here was my favorite thematic detail–a random assortment of Disneyland Long Playing Albums:

Shanghai Disney Retail
A tribute to Disneyland Records over the years. Photo by J. Jeff Kober.

Talk about showcasing the heritage of the most random Disney merchandise. Heidi and Black Beauty were not even Disney films. They just handled producing and distributing the albums for those films. It’s a testimony to randomness. Here’s another shelf:

Shanghai Disney Retail
I bought a lot of these albums as a kid–though not particularly these. Photo by J. Jeff Kober.

Some of these boutique stores are beautiful–Here we have a store tailored to Pandora product and other fine pieces.

Shanghai Disney Retail
The fine details of a Pandora shop. Photo by J. Jeff Kober.

Still, step into an adjoining store and you see that there are no ceilings that have been attached, leaving again a cluttered look:

Shanghai Disney Retail
A less than finished look. Photo by J. Jeff Kober.

Moving toward the exit we finally arrive at this main part of the store, much more handsomely finished than other sections.

Shanghai Disney Retail
This would be the traditional Emporium space, being the closest major retail to the exit as you move to the right. Photo by J. Jeff Kober.

From this end, there are two ways to exit the store. One is through this entry that has some nice stained glass touches:

A PhilarMagic style exit back out to Mickey Avenue. Photo by J. Jeff Kober.
A PhilharMagic style exit back out to Mickey Avenue. Photo by J. Jeff Kober.

But during peak times, you would be escorted with your purchases through a vault and into this bank:

Shanghai Disney Retail
This is only one side of this space. The other side was filled with guests checking out. Photo by J. Jeff Kober.

This would be Scrooge McDuck’s Bank. It’s a little recessed, and appearing from the front as a little inaccessible. In truth, there is no entrance from outside into this building. There is only an exit on the left side of the building.

Shanghai Disney Retail
You can’t enter through the vault door at Scrooge McDuck’s Bank. Photo by J. Jeff Kober.

You actually can find this same design at Tokyo Disneyland as well. The last store on the Emporium side is not a store but a long set of cash registers.

The same checkout concept in Tokyo Disneyland, also with a banking-style theme. Photo by J. Jeff Kober.
The same checkout concept in Tokyo Disneyland, also with a banking-style theme. Photo by J. Jeff Kober.

The difference is in the merchandise. Here, you have your standard fare. In Tokyo, the shop does not hold Emporium style merchandise, but boxed cookies and crackers. The big thing in Tokyo’s culture is that they like to bring gifts to those back home after they have visited the parks. That same cultural sentiment is not so much here.

Did You Miss Something?

We’ve covered a lot of retail space in this two-part series. As an encore, we leave you at World of Disney, found at the entrance to Disney Town.

World of Disney Entrance. Photo by J. Jeff Kober.
World of Disney Entrance. Photo by J. Jeff Kober.

The space is expectedly big, and it holds most all of the merchandise you can find in the park.

Looking across the store. Photo by J. Jeff Kober.
Looking across the store. Photo by J. Jeff Kober.

The map confirms the layout:

World of Disney store map. Photo by J. Jeff Kober.
World of Disney store map. Photo by J. Jeff Kober.

Here’s a compass if you get lost:

Is South marked with an "S" in Chinese? Photo by J. Jeff Kober.
Is South marked with an “S” in Chinese? Photo by J. Jeff Kober.

Theming stays to the aeronautical feel that have decorated most World of Disney stores.

A mural at the entry way above the compass. Photo by J. Jeff Kober.
A mural at the entry way above the compass. Photo by J. Jeff Kober.

But there are also many other tributes to different Disney films.

Surprising that the Jungle Book didn't get much attention in the park. Photo by J. Jeff Kober.
Surprising that the Jungle Book didn’t get much attention in the park. Photo by J. Jeff Kober.

There are even tributes to other Disney parks and attractions:

Look! Another Carthay Circle Theater! Photo by J. Jeff Kober.
Look! Another Carthay Circle Theater! Photo by J. Jeff Kober.

And even some that have long since left us.

20,000 Leagues Under the Sea at Disneyland? It's a great poster, but I'm not sure what it's purpose is. Photo by J. Jeff Kober.
20,000 Leagues Under the Sea at Disneyland? It’s a great poster, but I’m not sure what it’s purpose is. Photo by J. Jeff Kober.

At any rate, that’s a wrap for Retail at Shanghai Disneyland. There’s much to check out. Make sure that when you visit the parks, you take the time not only to do all of the amazing attractions, but to visit many of the stores that complement the entire park experience.

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